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Welcome!

Andy Buru is a medical massage therapist and a teacher of the Japanese rope art kinbaku/shibari. Active in Stockholm, Sweden and available for travels.

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Andy Buru

Are you looking for peace and tranquillity to meet yourself and others?

My work aims to create magical rooms were people can rest, heal and grow. My tools, spirit and experience springs from neurosemantic team building, medical massage therapy and Japanese rope art.


I work with both groups and individuals, and I love the fact that the world is allowed to be complicated because that makes every meeting unique. My time in Japan engraved into me the presence, passion and embrace for the glimpse of zen that exists in every movement of life – and this I gladly share with you in a session, workshop, or with a cup of tea.

What I teach

Japanese Rope Art

The art of tying and being tied has long been my favourite tool for teaching others and expressing myself. It speaks to me in so many different ways: As a philosophical question of beauty and free will (or if we live a life in bondage). As a physical, emotional and mental dialogue between people, and a deep spiritual practice. As an interesting visual art form that springs from a modern sharing culture and a historical legacy. The fact that tying people with rope is physical and concrete makes it a great vessel for more emotional and abstract subjects.

Power & Surrender

The act of consensually taking or surrendering power has been the focus of my own exploration during the past decade. To responsibly hold power and letting go into surrender are skills that can be taught and practised. In society today there is an imbalance that values power higher than surrender. The results are conflict and exhaustion in a non-consensual power dynamic. When done consensually letting go into surrender is peaceful and holding power is empowering, and together they create an intimate connection between two or more people. We all have an individual and constantly changing way towards power and surrender. This is why I believe in providing experiences and holding space that includes everything from physical sensations such as rope, pain and pleasure, to emotional sensations such as vulnerability, trust, pride and shame.

Play as the Way

I use playfulness as an methodology to approach subjects that are outside our comfort zone. May it questioning self-doubting ideas, archetypes in sexuality and power/surrender dynamics, or exploring our primal instincts. Being playful about something serious makes it safe because play does not seek to obliterate or transform differences. It allows for interaction and exploration because it operates on a deeper level where there are no differences that make a differences. Make believe and pretend that you are someone or something else, and in return you to taste an experience that may change your life in general.

Body Awareness and Anatomy

I believe being aware of our body and how it interacts with the space around us is a key to knowing ourselves. Because it provide instant feedback on our physical and emotional state of being. We feel butterflies in our tummy, stress building tension, warmth from other people and pain warning us when we are in danger. Listening to these sensations make us present here and now. In contact with others they form a wordless language that communicate feelings and intentions. Body awareness is an intuitive knowledge that we practice by interacting with ourselves and others. Anatomy is the schoolbook knowledge that we practice by studying the body. I teach the combination of body awareness and anatomy because they strengthens each other by both knowing and experiencing.

Writings in English

  • What is a Play Party Retreat? (2018) - Traveling around teaching this summer I've been trying to answer this question in an clear way, and I still struggle. It has to do with deconstruction of ideas about desire, sexuality, gender, attraction, kinks, characters, and archetypes. To temporarily create a space to try something new without being judged. Innocence is an important ingredient. It's about getting a group together. Physically in one place for a weekend. Sleeping, eating, and sauning together. And emotionally for playing together. So it's up to us to find the right people and hold space for that process. And the result is often magical.
  • How I learnt about Wabi-Sabi (2018) - Bondage and beauty is for me closely related. Both on a philosophical and aesthetical level. I truly enjoy the japanese imagery of bondage which is often related to suffering and mortality. It is often referred to as Wabi-Sabi, which is sometimes translated to the beauty of imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete. A couple of years ago I wanted to learn about this. Many people said that only a japanese can truly understand Wabi-Sabi. But I wanted to try and here is my journey into the world of japanese aesthetics for those who want to follow in my footsteps.
  • Workshop: Tantra meets kinbaku (2016) - In this workshop, you will learn how to use the ropes safely and successfully, to create a magic place where emotions can flow and a conscious play with power. You will learn to use ritualization to create your own magical place and negotiation of a consensual power dynamic. People's first reaction to Kinbaku is usually a surprisingly pleasurable encounter. They describe the ropes as extended arms in an embracing and bounding hug rather than restrictive. The communication between the person who ties and the person who gets tied is intimate and caring. However, under this pleasurable surface there is an array of emotional and physical experiences that can be explored in depth - pleasure, pain, power, surrender, playfulness, stillness and intimacy. In society today there is an imbalance that values power higher than surrender. The results are conflict and exhaustion in a non-consensual power dynamic. When done consensually letting go into surrender is peaceful and holding power is empowering, and together they create an intimate connection between two or more people. To responsibly hold power and letting go into surrender are skills that can be taught and practiced. Experience how power dynamics can temporarily help you let go of perfectionism, control freakishness and decisiveness, and feel the empowerment and sensuality of surrender.
  • Judith Hermans Trauma and Recovery in a BDSM and consent perspective (2016) - The best book I’ve read on the subject of trauma is by far Judith Hermans Trauma and Recovery – The Aftermath of Violence, From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. In this writing I would like to reflect upon parts of the content from a BDSM and consent perspective.
  • Rope Breaking Test (2013) - This is a short summary of the rope breaking tests I did at EURIX 2013 Spring a few days ago. I want to state that these tests are not aimed to be scientific evidence of anything.
  • Shame – a Road to Humiliation (2015) - I wanted to learn more about the emotional sides of BDSM, so I turned to three different books explaining three different models. “Masochism: A Jungian View” by Lyn Cowan, “Playing by Heart: The Vision and Practice of Belonging” by O. Fred Donaldson, and “Ut ur Kalahari: Drömmen om det goda livet” (in English something like; “Leaving Kalahari: Visions of the Good Life”) by Lasse Berg. This text is my attempt to put these three models together and create something through which I can view a tiny little part of a starlit night sky.
  • Pain and Kinbaku (2013) - This is a text about brains neurotransmitters how they affect us when practicing Kinbaku (Japanese rope bondage) or any kind of BDSM for that matter. The text will on a high level cover the inter-working between dopamine, endorphin, oxytocin and adrenalin. The text will also suggest how we can adapt our technique to better utilize the body's built in biochemical mechanisms to handle pain, give reward and create trust.